Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A mermaid or sea nymph.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • There, sure enough, a sea-maiden with a wicked face was tugging hard at a chain which she had fastened to the ship with a grappling iron, and was dragging it bit by bit beneath the waves.

    The Olive Fairy Book

  • You heard what I told you, that the sea-maiden said to me a mile farther along the road — and by the road she meant the river, for she can go by no other way — there was another herd of cattle waiting for me.

    The Yellow Fairy Book

  • Then taking a rusty knife from a heap of seaweed at his feet, he cut the rope round his waist and fastened the sea-maiden firmly to a stone, so that she could do no more mischief, and bidding her farewell, he swam back to the beach, where his clothes were still lying.

    The Olive Fairy Book

  • Gilian, remembering the tale of the sea-maiden who sat on the shore and dressed her hair with a comb of gold.

    Gilian The Dreamer His Fancy, His Love and Adventure

  • Our whole West Country is full of the most wonderful stories one might seek in vain for among the world of books and scholars -- of giants and dwarfs, fairies, wizards, water-horse, and sea-maiden.

    John Splendid The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn

  • Hither swam the sea-maiden with the beautiful prince.

    The Esperanto Teacher A Simple Course for Non-Grammarians

  • Thetis, the Nereid, or sea-maiden, was won to wife by Peleus.

    The Electra of Euripides Translated into English rhyming verse

  • You heard what I told you, that the sea-maiden said to me a mile farther along the road -- and by the road she meant the river, for she can go by no other way -- there was another herd of cattle waiting for me.

    The Yellow Fairy Book

  • Then taking a rusty knife from a heap of seaweed at his feet, he cut the rope round his waist and fastened the sea-maiden firmly to a stone, so that she could do no more mischief, and bidding her farewell, he swam back to the beach, where his clothes were still lying.

    The Olive Fairy Book

  • There, sure enough, a sea-maiden with a wicked face was tugging hard at a chain which she had fastened to the ship with a grappling iron, and was dragging it bit by bit beneath the waves.

    The Olive Fairy Book

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