Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Cruising at random on the ocean.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Roving over the sea in quest of booty; piracy.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • To Rhavas, the patriarch's speech was as opaque as if he'd suddenly started using the language of the sea-roving Haloga barbarians who dwelt beyond even distant Skopentzana.

    Bridge of the Separator

  • They were with the earl that winter and the summer after, till Kari went sea-roving; then they went with him, and harried far and wide that summer, and everywhere won the victory.

    The Story of Burnt Njal: the great Icelandic tribune, jurist, and counsellor

  • Tryggva, and then took to sea-roving, for piracy was still the Norseman's trade.

    Famous Sea Fights From Salamis to Tsu-Shima

  • One of the most famous battles of these northern wars of the sea-kings was fought in this period, when the old wild days of sea-roving were drawing to an end, and its picturesque story may well be told as that of a typical Norse battle, for its hero, King Olaf Tryggveson, was the ideal of a northern sea-king.

    Famous Sea Fights From Salamis to Tsu-Shima

  • Two sea-roving squadrons would sometimes challenge each other to battle for the mere sake of a fight.

    Famous Sea Fights From Salamis to Tsu-Shima

  • For Bemon's partner, named Frakk, weary of the toil of sea-roving, had lately withdrawn from partnership with him, after first making a money-bargain.

    The Danish History, Books I-IX

  • Now Ragnar had spent almost five years in sea-roving, and had quickly compelled all other nations to submit; but he found the Perms in open defiance of his sovereignty.

    The Danish History, Books I-IX

  • In the early spring, Alf and Alger, who had gone back to sea-roving, were exploring the sea in various directions, when they lighted with

    The Danish History, Books I-IX

  • Kanute and Harald enriched themselves with great gains from sea-roving, and most confidently aspired to lay hands on Ireland.

    The Danish History, Books I-IX

  • These followed the business of sea-roving from their youth up; and they chanced to sail all in one ship to the island

    The Danish History, Books I-IX

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