Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative spelling of sea buckthorn.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • At present, 1.2 million hectares (95 percent of world total) of seabuckthorn are under cultivation in 19 provinces.

    2. China

  • This is why the seabuckthorn bushes play such a prominent role in protecting river banks, preventing floods and minimizing slope erosion.

    2. China

  • The plant known in English as seabuckthorn, was recorded in the Tibetan medicinal classics (the Four Books of Pharmacopoeia) completed in the Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD).

    2. China

  • The Chinese government has invested more $25 million in seabuckthorn research and development.

    2. China

  • The seabuckthorn root system, for example, is so extensive that its roots can branch many times in a growing season and form a complex underground network that holds the soil from slippage like wire reinforcing mesh in concrete.

    2. China

  • Although China was one of the earliest countries in the world to use seabuckthorn as a medicinal plant, until 1980 its use was limited to Tibet and Mongolia.

    2. China

  • The processing of seabuckthorn medicinal products did not start in China until 1986.

    2. China

  • Approximately 50,000 tons of seabuckthorn berries are harvested annually and processed into 200,000 tons of various products valued at $35.7 million.

    2. China

  • It seems no wonder, therefore, that a 1990 assessment put China's total area of seabuckthorn at about I million hectares, and the total value of its products at more than $20 million per year.

    2. China

  • Annee advises choosing ingredients rich in essential fatty acids like natural vegetable oils such as evening primrose oil, blackcurrant or Argan and seabuckthorn.

    Evening Standard - Home

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