Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The quality of being seclusive.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

seclusive +‎ -ness

Examples

  • But she had joined two of the girls in the whispering, giggling seclusiveness of one of the big chairs, and, most of the company being deep in bridge, Graham found himself drifted into

    CHAPTER XI

  • Ackerson determined that both bashfulness and seclusiveness were negatively correlated with leadership.

    The Bass Handbook of Leadership

  • Ackerson determined that both bashfulness and seclusiveness were negatively correlated with leadership.

    The Bass Handbook of Leadership

  • Sooner or later the idealist feels himself uneasily inferior, and though he may compensate by achievement or by developing a strong trend towards seclusiveness, more often he regrets bitterly his idealism and in his heart envies the rich.

    The Foundations of Personality

  • But when it is noisy and disharmonious, then its very seclusiveness, its segregation, lends to the quarrels the bitterness of civil war.

    The Nervous Housewife

  • Richmond society has always claimed a certain seclusiveness for itself — not exclusiveness — for nobody properly introduced could visit Richmond without having a dinner or evening party given in his honor.

    My day : reminiscences of a long life,

  • It had gradually forgotten its seclusiveness, and now dropped its long legs at

    Earth's Enigmas A Volume of Stories

  • But she had joined two of the girls in the whispering, giggling seclusiveness of one of the big chairs, and, most of the company being deep in bridge, Graham found himself drifted into a group composed of Dick Forrest, Mr. Wombold,

    The Little Lady of the Big House

  • It was so pleasant there, that she spent much of her time in its seclusiveness.

    Story of Chester Lawrence

  • Men of exalted character are expected in our country to attend to their own concerns, not the concerns of the people, and to give the "boys" a chance; while the men of exalted intelligence are, by reason of the great industry and seclusiveness necessary to their work, too much wedded to their books and their quiet modes of life to rush into ward meetings and contend for political preferment with the "Mikes" and

    Black and White Land, Labor, and Politics in the South

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