Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of securitizer.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Three, Mr. Kahl's arguments mean that the typical nonprime lenders was violating the rules requiring that they make criminal referrals and engaged in widespread fraud in selling the fraudulent loans to private label securitizers and Fannie and Freddie.

    William K. Black: Lenders Put the Lies in Liar's Loans

  • Three, Mr. Kahl's arguments mean that the typical nonprime lenders was violating the rules requiring that they make criminal referrals and engaged in widespread fraud in selling the fraudulent loans to private label securitizers and Fannie and Freddie.

    William K. Black: Lenders Put the Lies in Liar's Loans

  • Three, Mr. Kahl's arguments mean that the typical nonprime lenders was violating the rules requiring that they make criminal referrals and engaged in widespread fraud in selling the fraudulent loans to private label securitizers and Fannie and Freddie.

    William K. Black: Lenders Put the Lies in Liar's Loans

  • Three, Mr. Kahl's arguments mean that the typical nonprime lenders was violating the rules requiring that they make criminal referrals and engaged in widespread fraud in selling the fraudulent loans to private label securitizers and Fannie and Freddie.

    William K. Black: Lenders Put the Lies in Liar's Loans

  • Three, Mr. Kahl's arguments mean that the typical nonprime lenders was violating the rules requiring that they make criminal referrals and engaged in widespread fraud in selling the fraudulent loans to private label securitizers and Fannie and Freddie.

    William K. Black: Lenders Put the Lies in Liar's Loans

  • Three, Mr. Kahl's arguments mean that the typical nonprime lenders was violating the rules requiring that they make criminal referrals and engaged in widespread fraud in selling the fraudulent loans to private label securitizers and Fannie and Freddie.

    William K. Black: Lenders Put the Lies in Liar's Loans

  • Fannie and Freddie did not start securitizing and selling large quantities of subprime and other exotic loans until 2007 or so, by which time private-label securitizers had already sowed the seeds of disaster.

    Redskins Insider Podcast -- The Washington Post

  • One explanation -- advanced by Lockhart -- is that Fannie and Freddie were competing for market share with the private label securitizers and had to purchase substantial amounts of subprime mortgages in order to retain their position in a growing market.

    Paul Kedrosky's Infectious Greed

  • Krugman produces data to show that a) Fannie and Freddie did not start securitizing large quantities of subprime and other exotic loans until 2007 or so, by which time private-label securitizers had already sowed the seeds of disaster and b) that Fannie and Freddie’s subprime business post-dated the years of fastest housing-price appreciation.

    Contending with Paul Krugman, part II

  • The Senate bill would force "securitizers" to retain 5 percent of whatever they issue for sale into the secondary market.

    Kentucky.com: Homepage

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