Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Judaism The ceremonial meal held on the first night or two nights of Passover.
  • noun Judaism One of the 54 parts into which the Torah is divided.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Hebrew סדר (seder, "order").

Examples

  • If what you take away from a Passover seder is that we’re still pissed about slavery, well then … it’s like coming away from the 4th of July thinking Americans would like nothing better than to shove a firecracker down the throat of Queen Elizabeth’s corgi.

    Waiting for Inglourious Basterds « The Blog at 16th and Q

  • The seder is a time for deep conversation, meaningful engagement and hopefully inspired action.

    Global Hunger and Passover

  • For all the grim events it recounts -- slavery, the Ten Plagues, etc. -- the seder is a celebration of escape and freedom, and as such is a joyous, happy event.

    Ellis Weiner: A Public Service from The Huffington Post: Dayenu 5766

  • On Friday evening, after I returned from dinner, we hosted some friends for a Tu B'Shvat seder, which is a meandering Hassidic custom about fruits, trees, and wine.

    Archive 2007-02-01

  • The seder is a very Rabbinic ritual, demanding that every participant “expound” ãåøù on the appropriate verses in deuteronomy “until the end of the parasha”.

    Even if all of us were wise | Jewschool

  • The seder is a pre-packaged curriculum that considers the multiple intelligences.

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • "That is an activity that is very church-centered, unlike a seder, which is very family-centered," said Shellenberger's husband, Mark, a United Methodist.

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • For Newman, the best part is that the seder is a more memorable event for the family.

    statesman.com - Highschool

  • The seder is our story of escaping bondage which is both physical and mental.

    The Citizen

  • These plagues will be remembered tonight as part of a ritual dinner called a seder in Jewish homes around the world.

    American Thinker

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.