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Examples

  • The Grass's of this neighbourhood are generally coarse harsh and sedge-like, and grow in large tufts. there is none except in the open grounds. near the coast on the top of some of the untimbered hills there is a finer and softer species which resemble much the greens word. the salt marshes also produce

    Original journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, 1804-1806

  • In all else they show the customary features of an atoll: the low horizon, the expanse of the lagoon, the sedge-like rim of palm-tops, the sameness and smallness of the land, the hugely superior size and interest of sea and sky.

    In the South Seas

  • They could see that upon one side another stream ran in, with a very sluggish current; and around the mouth of this, and for a good stretch below it, there appeared a green sedge-like water-grass, or rushes.

    The Young Voyageurs Boy Hunters in the North

  • Then came plantations of the sugar-cane, with its sedge-like blades of pale-green, then extensive tracts of pasturage with scattered shrubs and tall dead weeds, the growth of the last summer, and a thin herbage bitten close to the soil.

    Letters of a Traveller Notes of Things Seen in Europe and America

  • These parallel, elliptical-shaped, sedge-like blades are stiff, giving the gardener clean vertical lines to work with.

    SFGate: Top News Stories

  • The grasses of this neighbourhood are generally coa [r] se harsh and sedge-like, and grow in large tufts. there is none except in the open grounds. near the coast on the tops of some of the untimbered hills there is a finer and softer species which resembles much the green swoard. the salt marshes also produce a coarse grass, Bull rushes and the Cattail flagg. of the two last the natives make great use in preparing their mats bags &c.

    Original journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, 1804-1806

  • The grasses of this neighbourhood are generally coase harsh and sedge-like, and grow in large tufts. there is none except in the open grounds. near the coast on the tops of some of the untimbered hills there is a finer and softer species which resembles much the green swoard. the salt marshes also produce a coarse grass, Bull rushes and the Cattail flagg. the two last the natives make great use in preparing their mats bags &c.

    The Journals of Lewis and Clark, 1804-1806

  • a conic cap inverted, but scarcely hollowed at the base above a foot high, made of a coarse sedge-like plant, the upper part of which, and the edges, are ornamented with beautiful red feathers, and to the point, or lower part, is fixed a gourd-shell larger than the fist.

    A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 16

  • a considerable way up the hills, in bunches or tufts, with sedge-like leaves, bearing, on a long stalk, yellowish flowers, which are succeeded by a long roundish pod, filled with very thin shining black seeds.

    A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels — Volume 15 Forming A Complete History Of The Origin And Progress Of Navigation, Discovery, And Commerce, By Sea And Land, From The Earliest Ages To The Present Time

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