Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Obsolete spelling of seek.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Because I have found this worke to have since beene published (and to an ill end) by such as seeke to trouble and subvert the state of our common-wealth, nor caring whether they shall reforme it or no; which they have fondly inserted among other writings of their invention, I have revoked my intent, which was to place it here.

    Of Friendship.

  • 2 Also that it would please his highnes not to giue credite vnto false and vntrue reports, by such as seeke to sowe dissension, and breake friendship betwixt the Queenes highnesse, and his

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • 2 Also that it would please his highnes not to giue credite vnto false and vntrue reports, by such as seeke to sowe dissension, and breake friendship betwixt the Queenes highnesse, and his Maiestie.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation — Volume 04

  • In the closing sentence, she pulled no punches: "And again because it is not unknowne to my Lord [Bedford] nor to any of you all but that it is most requisite for me to seeke some pastures for myself, which had never none out of Lease appointed me by others."

    From Heads of Household to Heads of State: The Preaccession Households of Mary and Elizabeth Tudor, 1516-1558

  • Around the time English players were performing Hamlet on the Continent, John Winthrop the father, sounding like a Puritan Polonius, advised his wayward son to “seeke the Lorde in the first place,” to “keepe diligent watche over your selfe,” and to “be not rashe upon ostentation of valor, to adventure your selfe to unnecessarye dangers.”

    The King's Best Highway

  • As yet but knocke, breathe, shine, and seeke to mend;

    rough week

  • It fell Mr. Robinsone to seeke the blessing, who said one of the most bombastick graces that ever I heard in my life.

    Lay Morals

  • How much more honest and just is it then for us, and for every other well-disposed person, to seeke for (without wronging any) and to practise all remedies that wee can, for the conservation of our lives?

    The Decameron

  • Thou hast forgotte, how thou broughtst us to the plaine of Mugnone, to seeke for black invisible stones: which having found, thou concealedst them to thy selfe, stealing home invisibly before us, and making us follow like fooles after thee.

    The Decameron

  • Calandrino, if thou be angry with any other, yet thou shouldest not have made such a mockery of us, as thou hast done: in leaving us (like a couple of coxcombes) to the plaine of Mugnone, whether thou leddest us with thee, to seeke a precious stone called Helitropium.

    The Decameron

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