Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Second-person singular simple present form of seem.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

seem + -est

Examples

  • He cannot fight the match of which thou seemest so desirous — but here stands Brenhilda, born heiress of Aspramonte, by marriage the wedded wife of the good Count of

    Count Robert of Paris

  • “Damsel,” said he, “thou seemest in no ordinary distress; peradventure, like myself, thou hast been refused passage at the bridge by the churlish keeper, and thy crossing may concern thee either for performance of a vow, or some other weighty charge.”

    The Monastery

  • May Maia's princely son go with thee on thy way to bring thee to thy home, and mayest thou attain that on which thy soul is set so firmly, for to my mind thou seemest a generous man, O Aegeus.

    Medea

  • I am no busy body as thou seemest to suppose, and on this account I am known as

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Yet thou seemest to turn thee away from me out of coquetry, for all, O my darling, thou camest to me, whilst

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Spake she of the oak-wreath: This; thou shalt tell me what I am like in thine eyes first, because thou wert afraid of me; and then when thou art done, I will tell thee what thou seemest to me.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Birdalone sought catch, and brought home venison to the dame, who was yet blithe with her, and spake that evening as she eyed her: I cannot tell how it is, but thou seemest changed unto me, and lookest more towards thy womanhood than even yesterday.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • But again the old carle drew nigher to her, and said: Thou seemest to have a good bow and store of arrows; if thou wouldst lend them to me for a little, and come with me into the wood hard by, I might shoot thee some venison with little toil to thee; whereas, forsooth, thou lookest scarce like one who is meet for over-much toil.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • And yet I know not; for thou seemest to me so kind and loving and true, that I am fain that thou shouldest know how sorely I love thy friend and mine.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Even so, if alternately thou turn thy gaze upon the vile earth and upon the heavens, though all without thee stand still, by the mere laws of sight thou seemest now sunk in the mire, now soaring among the stars.

    Consolation of Philosophy

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