Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adv. superlative form of seldom: most seldom.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Swellings in the belly less frequently form abscesses than those in the hypochondrium; and seldomest of all, those below the navel are converted into suppuration; but you may rather expect a hemorrhage from the upper parts.

    The Book Of Prognostics

  • He is a tramp, we should say, who relies most on his own legs and resources, who least cushions himself daintily against jar in his neighbor's tonneau, whose eye shines out seldomest from the curb for a lift.

    Journeys to Bagdad

  • I find it is the one I most value here in the household and seldomest get.

    Complete Letters of Mark Twain

  • He used to fringe the river all the way; his close-ranked merchandise stretched from the one city to the other, along the banks, and he sold uncountable cords of it every year for cash on the nail; but all the scattering boats that are left burn coal now, and the seldomest spectacle on the Mississippi to-day is a wood-pile.

    Life on the Mississippi

  • But for light, even for train-oil to be burned in the simplest of lamps, money had to be paid -- and money was of all ordinary things the seldomest seen at

    Warlock o' Glenwarlock

  • "_Anstace_ was wont to say -- my _Anstace_, not yours, my maids -- that she which did commonly put herself in the lowest place should the seldomest find her out of her reckoning."

    Joyce Morrell's Harvest The Annals of Selwick Hall

  • For the finer the nature, the more flaws it will show through the clearness of it; and it is a law of this universe, that the best things shall be seldomest seen in their best form.

    Selections From the Works of John Ruskin

  • They met oftenest where the doctor went seldomest, -- in those rooms where Dr. Harrison did sometimes let his profession call him, where Mr. Linden was drawn by somewhat beyond profession.

    Say and Seal, Volume I

  • 'To repress and hold-in such sudden anger he was continually' careful, 'and succeeded well: -- right, Samson; that it may become in thee as noble central heat, fruitful, strong, beneficent; not blaze out, or the seldomest possible blaze out, as wasteful volcanoism to scorch and consume!

    Past and Present Thomas Carlyle's Collected Works, Vol. XIII.

  • "To repress and hold-in such sudden anger he was continually careful," and succeeded well: -- right, Samson; that it may become in thee as noble central heat, fruitful, strong, beneficent; not blaze out, or the seldomest possible blaze out, as wasteful volcanoism to scorch and consume!

    Past and Present

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