Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who deceives himself.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Lucy herself is seen neither as pitiable victim nor heroic coper: she is a liar, self-deceiver and ruthless exploiter of her mother's private wealth but also someone whose recovery hinges on a confrontation with truth.

    Knot of the Heart – review

  • Six months into Iraq and with no exit in sight, Mr. Rumsfeld asked his staff, “Are we capturing, killing or deterring more terrorists every day than the madrassah and the radical clerics are recruiting?” only to turn away from the worrying reply.8 To be master of the answer before you have asked the question, ready to “stay the course” no matter what you hear, is the mark of the self-deceiver, not the public servant.

    Magic and Mayhem

  • The book's main character is a trickster, self-deceiver, anti-Semitic and anti-Islamic Jew, bisexual and friend of fascism.

    March 2006

  • And yet it is difficult to see how the self-deceiver could fail to be aware of her intention to deceive.

    Self-Deception

  • The requirement that the self-deceiver holds contradictory beliefs raises the ˜static™ paradox, since it seems to pose an impossible state of mind, namely, consciously believing p and

    Self-Deception

  • It requires, among other things: determining the degree of control self-deceivers have; what the self-deception is about (Is it important morally or otherwise?); what ends the self-deception serves (Does it serve mental health or as a cover for moral wrongdoing?); how entrenched it is (Is it episodic or habitual?); and, whether it is escapable (What means of correction are available to the self-deceiver?).

    Self-Deception

  • Whether self-deception is due to a character defect or not, ascriptions of responsibility depend upon whether the self-deceiver has control over the biasing effects of her desires and emotions.

    Self-Deception

  • The self-deceiver need not even forget her original intention to deceive, so an unbeliever who sets out to get herself to believe in God (since she thinks such a belief is prudent, having read Pascal) might well remember such an intention at the end of the process and deem that by God's grace even this misguided path led her to the truth.

    Self-Deception

  • Here the self-deceiver need never simultaneously hold contradictory beliefs even though she intends to bring it about that she believe p, which she regards as false at the outset of the process of deceiving herself and true at its completion.

    Self-Deception

  • The requirement that the self-deceiver intentionally gets herself to hold a believe she knows to be false raises the

    Self-Deception

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