Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Ignorant of one's self.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Do not believe, however, that in all this he was dishonest or hypocritical; he was merely self-ignorant -- blind to the fact that in condemning the alcoholic inebriate he was by every word condemning himself as well.

    The Opium Habit

  • But the Vain are foolish and self-ignorant, and that palpably: because they attempt honourable things, as though they were worthy, and then they are detected.

    Ethics

  • This proves that they are self-ignorant; that they know neither their sin nor its bitter end.

    Sermons to the Natural Man

  • The thoughtless man may never know while upon earth, even "in part," the depth and the bitterness of this fountain, -- he may go through this life for the most part self-ignorant and undistressed, -- but he must know in that other, final, world the immense fulness of its woe, as it unceasingly wells up into everlasting death.

    Sermons to the Natural Man

  • He cannot endow the self-ignorant and incredulous man before him, with that consciousness of the "plague of the heart" which says "yea" to the most vivid description of human sinfulness, and "amen" to God's heaviest malediction upon it.

    Sermons to the Natural Man

  • Every vulgar self-ignorant person in Florence was glibly pronouncing on this man's demerits, while _he_ was knowing a depth of sorrow which can only be known to the soul that has loved and sought the most perfect thing, and beholds itself fallen.

    Romola

  • So likewise with the self-ignorant, neglectful, self-deceiving.

    Sermons. Volume Third.

  • We can look at nature and see a perfect model of instinct in action, and use that as a basis for understanding our own natures, rather than maligning or fleeing from them and becoming self-ignorant, then wondering why some of us are so miserable.

    Hartford Advocate: News

  • We can look at nature and see a perfect model of instinct in action, and use that as a basis for understanding our own natures, rather than maligning or fleeing from them and becoming self-ignorant, then wondering why some of us are so miserable.

    Hartford Advocate: News

  • We can look at nature and see a perfect model of instinct in action, and use that as a basis for understanding our own natures, rather than maligning or fleeing from them and becoming self-ignorant, then wondering why some of us are so miserable.

    Hartford Advocate: News

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