Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Selfish or excessive regard for one's personal advantage or interest.
  • noun Personal advantage or interest.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Private interest; the interest or advantage of one's self, without regard to altruistic gratification.
  • noun Selfishness; pursuit of egotistical interests exclusively, without regard to conscience.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Private interest; the interest or advantage of one's self.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun One's personal interest or advantage, especially when pursued without regard for others.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun taking advantage of opportunities without regard for the consequences for others
  • noun concern for your own interests and welfare

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

self- +‎ interest

Examples

  • That is, the world is transforming in ways that require shifting away from the short-term self-interest that's defined our way of life.

    Douglas LaBier: What Are the Emotional Drivers of Our National Unraveling?

  • Others, like David Brooks in The New York Times, contend that cooperation is more evolutionary than episodic, intertwined with competition: "We have an incentive to work in teams, even against our short-term self-interest because cohesive groups thrive."

    Christopher Holshek: The Power of Both

  • That is, the world is transforming in ways that require shifting away from the short-term self-interest that's defined our way of life.

    Douglas LaBier: What Are the Emotional Drivers of Our National Unraveling?

  • That is, the world is transforming in ways that require shifting away from the short-term self-interest that's defined our way of life.

    Douglas LaBier: What Are the Emotional Drivers of Our National Unraveling?

  • In order to justify the appropriateness of more integration, we may have to persuade ourselves of the degeneracy of aggregative institutions and the glories of rights, reasoned debate, and administrative autonomy, while at the same time recognizing that within a few decades we will rediscover the evils of integration and will once again embrace exchange in the name of self-interest.

    Rediscovering Institutions

  • In order to justify the appropriateness of more integration, we may have to persuade ourselves of the degeneracy of aggregative institutions and the glories of rights, reasoned debate, and administrative autonomy, while at the same time recognizing that within a few decades we will rediscover the evils of integration and will once again embrace exchange in the name of self-interest.

    Rediscovering Institutions

  • In order to justify the appropriateness of more integration, we may have to persuade ourselves of the degeneracy of aggregative institutions and the glories of rights, reasoned debate, and administrative autonomy, while at the same time recognizing that within a few decades we will rediscover the evils of integration and will once again embrace exchange in the name of self-interest.

    Rediscovering Institutions

  • For such individuals the public interest becomes an ethical criterion and a spur to conscience and deliberation, a stimulus to a process for imagining a sense of public purpose and public morality, rather than negotiating a bargain in the name of self-interest Dyson, 1980: 274.

    Rediscovering Institutions

  • For such individuals the public interest becomes an ethical criterion and a spur to conscience and deliberation, a stimulus to a process for imagining a sense of public purpose and public morality, rather than negotiating a bargain in the name of self-interest Dyson, 1980: 274.

    Rediscovering Institutions

  • For such individuals the public interest becomes an ethical criterion and a spur to conscience and deliberation, a stimulus to a process for imagining a sense of public purpose and public morality, rather than negotiating a bargain in the name of self-interest Dyson, 1980: 274.

    Rediscovering Institutions

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