Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Redress of a wrong by the victim; revenge, retribution.
  • v. To redress a wrong against oneself; to take revenge.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From self- +‎ redress.

Examples

  • The Governments of Denmark and of Naples have been recently reminded of those yet existing against them, nor will any of them be forgotten while a hope may be indulged of obtaining justice by the means within the constitutional power of the Executive, and without resorting to those means of self-redress which, as well as the time, circumstances, and occasion which may require them, are within the exclusive competency of the Legislature.

    State of the Union Address (1790-2001)

  • But I think that, upon study and reflection, we must all agree with the Hague Conference of 1907 that the nations are logically at the door of the next chapter of international development away from self-redress, a chapter that calls for the court of justice as we all understand it, rather than a mere arbitration tribunal.

    The Supreme Court of the World

  • The sittlichkeit compels resort to courts and obedience to their decisions rather than resort to self-redress by duel or violence.

    The Supreme Court of the World

  • War, the self-redress of nations, has certainly been reduced, although it has not been superseded by arbitration.

    The Supreme Court of the World

  • As in the history of Rome, self-redress was succeeded by arbitration and arbitration by courts of justice, and as similar processes have occurred in many nations, so in international life that succession appears to be taking place before our eyes.

    The Supreme Court of the World

  • But in the main the law started from those intentional wrongs which are the simplest and most pronounced cases, as well as the nearest to the feeling of revenge which leads to self-redress.

    The Common Law

  • If no other right were given but to reduce a debtor to slavery, the law might be taken to look only to compensation, and to be modelled on the natural working of self-redress.

    The Common Law

  • So that, in a word, this procedure, modelled on the self-redress natural to the case which gave rise to it, was the only remedy, was confined to the man in possession, and was not open to the owner unless he was that man.

    The Common Law

  • By this brutal act of self-redress, no room was left for irresolution or repentance, and it seemed as if a single crime could be absolved only by a series of violences.

    The Works of Frederich Schiller

  • The Supreme Court of the United States, the first real court deciding controversies between states, furnishes the evident analogy and illustration for the proposed court of the states of the world, coming as it did after, first self-redress as between the original states, then a process of arbitration provided for by the Articles of Confederation, and finally our great court, the greatest invention of our Constitution, unique not only as a tribunal of states, but as clothed with the - power to say in concrete cases whether legislation is void because of repugnance to the Constitution of the United States.

    The Supreme Court of the World

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