Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Half-civilized.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Half barbarous.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Half barbarous; not fully civilised.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

semi- +‎ barbarous

Examples

  • Nothing short of a semibarbarous public opinion would permit them to exist.

    Black and White

  • Nothing short of a semibarbarous public opinion would permit them to exist.

    Black and White

  • Nothing short of a semibarbarous public opinion would permit them to exist.

    Black and White

  • Nothing short of a semibarbarous public opinion would permit them to exist.

    Black and White

  • Nothing short of a semibarbarous public opinion would permit them to exist.

    Black and White

  • It has been the destiny of the government of the East India Company to suggest the true theory of the government of a semibarbarous dependency by a civilised country, and after having done this, to perish.

    Representative Government

  • Yet they should hardly surprise one among a semibarbarous nation, which does nothing like other peoples, and which deems itself authorised to place the censer in the hands of its monarch, and its monarch in the hands of the headsman.

    Court Memoirs of France Series — Complete

  • The cattle-farms or _hatos_ of the Plains are owned, for the most part, by the Creole residents of the cities which dot their outskirts, but are inhabited only by the semibarbarous _hateros_, who attend to the few requirements of the stock, and slaughter the annual supply.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 03, No. 16, February, 1859

  • If then the civilised Greeks of Asia and Athens habitually sacrificed men whom they regarded as incarnate gods, there can be no inherent improbability in the supposition that at the dawn of history a similar custom was observed by the semibarbarous Latins in the Arician Grove.

    Chapter 58. Human Scapegoats in Classical Antiquity. § 2. The Human Scapegoat in Ancient Greece

  • If then the civilised Greeks of Asia and Athens habitually sacrificed men whom they regarded as incarnate gods, there can be no inherent improbability in the supposition that at the dawn of history a similar custom was observed by the semibarbarous Latins in the Arician Grove.

    The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion

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