Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of semivowel.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I'm merely exploring a more general phenomenon here, one in which stops neighbouring closed vowels or semivowels are universally more prone to affrication.

    Concern trolls and the Etruscan bilabial 'f'

  • If you're claiming that there was an earlier contrast between, say, *(y)i- ( *yə-) and *ʔi- ( *ʔə) then I supposed I can accept that as a possibility, although I think rather that initial vowels *i- and *u- yielded *ʔə while semivowels were already in existence beforehand to supply the language with semivowels after the reduction of the vowel system.

    The Great Pre-IE Centralization

  • In speech again there are infinite varieties of sound, and some one who was a wise man, or more than man, comprehended them all in the classes of mutes, vowels, and semivowels, and gave to each of them a name, and assigned them to the art of grammar.

    Philebus

  • Must we not begin in the same way with letters; first separating the vowels, and then the consonants and mutes, into classes, according to the received distinctions of the learned; also the semivowels, which are neither vowels, nor yet mutes; and distinguishing into classes the vowels themselves?

    The CRATYLUS

  • It is a significant fact in this connection that M is the only one of the liquids (semivowels) that does not allow a long vowel before it.

    The Roman Pronunciation of Latin Why we use it and how to use it

  • All other consonants are _semivowels_, and are pronounced with a

    Orthography As Outlined in the State Course of Study for Illinois

  • The semivowels belong to Word and Life, but the vowels to Man and Church, for through Man voice gave power to all.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

  • These elementary sounds are either vowels, semivowels, or mutes.

    Poetics. English

  • First, we separate the alphabet into classes of letters, distinguishing the consonants, mutes, vowels, and semivowels; and when we have learnt them singly, we shall learn to know them in their various combinations of two or more letters; just as the painter knows how to use either a single colour, or a combination of colours.

    Cratylus

  • SOCRATES: Must we not begin in the same way with letters; first separating the vowels, and then the consonants and mutes (letters which are neither vowels nor semivowels), into classes, according to the received distinctions of the learned; also the semivowels, which are neither vowels, nor yet mutes; and distinguishing into classes the vowels themselves?

    Cratylus

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