Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Things that can be sensed; stimuli.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But if, as we have maintained, what is given is never the thing, but merely one of the "sensibilia" which compose the thing, then what we apprehend in a dream is just as much given as what we apprehend in waking life.

    Mysticism and Logic and Other Essays

  • Starting from what common sense regards as persistent things, and making only such modifications as from time to time seem reasonable, we arrive at assemblages of "sensibilia" which are found to obey certain simple laws, namely those of dynamics.

    Mysticism and Logic and Other Essays

  • These "sensibilia" which are not data to anyone are therefore to be taken rather as an illustrative hypothesis and as an aid in preliminary statement than as a dogmatic part of the philosophy of physics in its final form.

    Mysticism and Logic and Other Essays

  • The motions which are regarded as occurring, during a period in which all the "sensibilia" and the times of their appearance are given, will be different according to the manner in which we combine "sensibilia" at different times as belonging to the same piece of matter.

    Mysticism and Logic and Other Essays

  • The inferred entities which I shall allow myself are of two kinds: (_a_) the sense-data of other people, in favour of which there is the evidence of testimony, resting ultimately upon the analogical argument in favour of minds other than my own; (_b_) the "sensibilia" which would appear from places where there happen to be no minds, and which I suppose to be real although they are no one's data.

    Mysticism and Logic and Other Essays

  • But if "sensibilia" are to be recognised as the ultimate constituents of the physical world, a long and difficult journey is to be performed before we can arrive either at the "thing" of common sense or at the

    Mysticism and Logic and Other Essays

  • This is effected by means of the correlated "sensibilia" which are regarded as the appearances, in different perspectives, of one and the same thing.

    Mysticism and Logic and Other Essays

  • What is proved is that its hypotheses, though unverifiable where they go beyond sense-data, are at no point in contradiction with sense-data, but, on the contrary, are ideally such as to render all sense-data calculable when a sufficient collection of "sensibilia" is given.

    Mysticism and Logic and Other Essays

  • I should hope that, with further elaboration, the part played by unperceived "sensibilia" could be indefinitely diminished, probably by invoking the history of a "thing" to eke out the inferences derivable from its momentary appearance.

    Mysticism and Logic and Other Essays

  • If we can always say when two "sensibilia" in a given biography are appearances of one thing, then, since we have seen how to connect "sensibilia" in different biographies as appearances of the same momentary state of a thing, we shall have all that is necessary for the complete construction of the history of a thing.

    Mysticism and Logic and Other Essays

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