sergeant-at-law love

sergeant-at-law

Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an English barrister of the highest rank

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The sergeant-at-law, Pound dryly observed, “would thoroughly understand a modern industrial commission.”

    Archive 2008-09-01

  • Joseph Girdler, sergeant-at-law of the Inner Temple, complained in 1733 that his fathers estate was being devoured by the mad doctors, with Dr James Monro demanding 130 for treatment, while Girdler thought him not worth a quarter of that sum.

    Bedlam

  • The novel, which is the first to be published under the author's real name, follows Sir Richard Lee, sergeant-at-law, who is sent to Sandal Castle in 1322 by King Edward II.

    The Pardoner's Crime, by Keith Souter

  • In 1824 he became a sergeant-at-law; and he was appointed King's Sergeant in 1827, and Solicitor-General in 1839, when he received the honor of knighthood.

    International Weekly Miscellany - Volume 1, No. 8, August 19, 1850

  • A celebrated medium was, however, present, as were some half-dozen ladies and gentlemen well known in society -- one of the latter being a sergeant-at-law, and a judge accustomed to sift evidence and determine the difference between truth and falsehood.

    The Mysteries of All Nations Rise and Progress of Superstition, Laws Against and Trials of Witches, Ancient and Modern Delusions Together With Strange Customs, Fables, and Tales

  • Montague to be a sergeant-at-law he intended a further mark of favour to him and to the City, and did not intend that he should lose his place. —

    London and the Kingdom - Volume II

  • The sacrist had finished his exposition, and the sergeant-at-law was about to conclude a case which Nigel could in no way controvert, when help came to him from an unexpected quarter.

    Sir Nigel

  • His studies were continued, and in time he became a clerk of his kinsman, “Judge Nicholls,” whose name appears in letters, and who was a sergeant-at-law.

    Anne Bradstreet and Her Time

  • † Three brothers of the family of Peere Williams, sergeant-at-law, London, and famous reporter — John, William, and Otho Williams — migrated to America early in the eighteenth century.

    Virginia and Virginians

  • His studies were continued, and in time he became a clerk of his kinsman, "Judge Nicholls," whose name appears in letters, and who was a sergeant-at-law.

    Anne Bradstreet and Her Time

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