Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A setter.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But the open casket contained matter, or rather metal, so attractive to old Trapbois, that he remained fixed, like a setting-dog at a dead point, his nose advanced, and one hand expanded like the lifted forepaw, by which that sagacious quadruped sometimes indicates that it is a hare which he has in the wind.

    The Fortunes of Nigel

  • Hen-harriers fly low over heaths or fields of corn, and beat the ground regularly like a pointer or setting-dog.

    MacMillan's Reading Books Book V

  • Horace Walpole describes Birch as 'a worthy, good-natured soul, full of industry and activity, and running about like a young setting-dog in quest of anything, new or old, and with no parts, taste, or judgment. '

    Life Of Johnson

  • ` ` Awa to the town about the captain's fowling-gun, and his setting-dog. ''

    The Antiquary

  • "Awa to the town about the captain's fowling-gun, and his setting-dog."

    The Antiquary — Volume 02

  • Trapbois, that he remained fixed, like a setting-dog at a dead point, his nose advanced, and one hand expanded like the lifted forepaw, by which that sagacious quadruped sometimes indicates that it is a hare which he has in the wind.

    The Fortunes of Nigel

  • Walpole describes Birch as 'a worthy, good-natured soul, full of industry and activity, and running about like a young setting-dog in quest of anything, new or old, and with no parts, taste, or judgment. '

    Life of Johnson, Volume 1 1709-1765

  • Three or four have struck me particularly, as Dr. Birch, (376) who was a worthy, good-natured soul, full of industry and activity, and running about like a young setting-dog in quest of any thing, new or old, and with no parts, taste, or judgment.

    The Letters of Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford — Volume 4

  • In this irregular country we can stand on an eminence and see them beat the fields over like a setting-dog, and often drop down in the grass or corn.

    The Natural History of Selborne, Vol. 2

  • Hen - harriers fly low over heaths or fields of corn, and beat the ground regularly like a pointer or setting-dog.

    The Natural History of Selborne, Vol. 2

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