Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of shako.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • "A blitz start, massed shakos, plumes dancing like a flustered henhouse; a period of svelte progress recorded in ebullient despatches as the enemy falls back; then the beginning of a long morale-sapping trudge with rations getting shorter and the first snowflakes on your face."

    FA makes rod for its back by insisting on English coach

  • Combeferre followed, carrying the shoulder-belts and the shakos.

    Les Miserables

  • Some crawled flat on their faces as far as the crest of the curve of the bridge, taking care that their shakos did not project beyond it.

    Les Miserables

  • I have picked out the shakos of the fifth of the line, and the standard-bearers of the sixth legion.

    Les Miserables

  • BTW, to help with the color scheme (seeing how this is a B&W photo), the jackets were orange, the pants were navy blue with orange trim, and the shakos were blue with white trim (with orange plumes for the horn line and color guard, blue for the drums, and white for the DM).

    Archive 2006-03-01

  • There are also artillery crew figures, light infantry in shakos and bearskins that were part of the old range.

    Early Elite Miniatures - I Want These Figures

  • I am still basking in the after glow of a great wargame and thoughts of shakos and squares are filling my head.

    Butterflies Are Running Amok

  • A blitz start, massed shakos, plumes dancing like a flustered henhouse; a period of svelte progress recorded in ebullient dispatches as the enemy falls back; then the beginning of a long, morale-sapping trudge with rations getting shorter and the first snowflakes upon your face.

    It Never Changes

  • But you make me think of a time when you were indeed wonderful to behold — when the little French soldiers wore white cockades in their shakos — when the diligence was forty hours going to

    Roundabout Papers

  • There was a living in the family, which it was important for Mr. Bloundell to hold; and, being in a dragoon regiment at the time when his third brother, for whom the living was originally intended, sickened and died, Mr. Bloundell determined upon quitting crimson pantaloons and sable shakos, for the black coat and white neckcloth of the English divine.

    The History of Pendennis

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.