Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A small inclosure for sheep with a shepherd's house in it; a pen.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Nor is the first sixth a fit day for a girl to be born, but a kindly for gelding kids and sheep and for fencing in a sheep-cote.

    Hesiod, Homeric Hymns, and Homerica

  • And thus was this wild wolf to be led into the sheep-cote; this infernal navvy to be introduced among the angels of Surbiton

    The Three Clerks

  • Some say he shall be stoned; but that death is too soft for him, say I draw our throne into a sheep-cote! all deaths are too few, the sharpest too easy.

    The Winter’s Tale

  • Though the nights were cold, and grew colder, he always found shelter of a sort -- a sheep-cote, a cave, even a wooded bank -- and there was no rain.

    The Wicked Day

  • Willow and alder lined every smallest stream, and along the roadways, on the slopes, bordering the moorland stretches and sheltering every cottage and sheep-cote, were trees and more trees, all in the russet and gold and rich red of autumn, backed with the black glint of holly and the dark accent of the pines.

    The Wicked Day

  • He found a sheep-cote on the side of the mountain and lay down and slept between sheep.

    The King of Ireland's Son

  • Mark thirdly the varied repetition, ‘if cottage were in view, sheep-cote or herd—but cottage, herd, or sheep-cote, none he saw.

    III. On the Difference between Verse and Prose

  • Or flocks, or herds, or human face divine. orBut cottage, herd, or sheep-cote, none he saw. and this basal difference you must have clear in your minds before, in dealing with prose or verse, you can practise either with profit or read either with intelligent delight.

    III. On the Difference between Verse and Prose

  • ’ Lastly compare the whole with such an account as you or I or Cluvienus would write in plain prose: —Thereupon he climbed a hill on the chance that the view from its summit might disclose some sign of human habitation—a herd, a sheep-cote, a cottage perhaps.

    III. On the Difference between Verse and Prose

  • Do not for one moment imagine that when Milton writes: —But cottage, herd, or sheep-cote, none he saw. orOf man’s first disobedience and the fruit

    III. On the Difference between Verse and Prose

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