Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A room occupied by one who is sick.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A black screen was drawn across his mirror of inner vision, and fancy lay in a darkened sick-room where entered no ray of light.

    Chapter 17

  • The light burned dimly and steadily and he had the feel that it was a sick-room.

    JUST MEAT

  • My goal in this book is to explore this world of thought through the prism of the sick-room.

    Pestilence and Headcolds: Encountering Illness in Colonial Mexico

  • This is the world of the sick-room, both a physical space abounding with strange tonics and brews, bleedings and leeches, curanderas and barber-surgeons, and saints and virgins, as well as a cultural space complete with its own structures of meaning.

    Pestilence and Headcolds: Encountering Illness in Colonial Mexico

  • “You are a better physician than I, Sir Thomas,” said the prelate — “a soothing falsehood is fitter for a sick-room than an unpleasing truth.”

    The Talisman

  • An hour later Paz returned to the sick-room, and began anew, with death in his heart, his care of the count.

    The Imaginary Mistress

  • An hour later Paz returned to the sick-room, and began anew, with death in his heart, his care of the count.

    The Imaginary Mistress

  • Helmer's refined nature gives him an unconquerable disgust of everything that is ugly; I won't have him in my sick-room.

    A Doll's House

  • Her face might be a trifle paler, and the circles round her eyes a little blacker than usual; but whenever she came out from the sick-room she was always smiling, fresh, and neat, and looked as trim in her little dressing-gown and cap, as in her smartest evening suit.

    Vanity Fair

  • When women are brooding over their children, or busied in a sick-room, who has not seen in their faces those sweet angelic beams of love and pity?

    Vanity Fair

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