Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A Jewish prayer book for everyday use.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The Jewish prayer-book.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Judaism A prayer book containing a set order of daily prayers.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Mishnaic Hebrew siddûr, arrangement, from siddēr, to arrange, derived stem of sādar; see sdr in Semitic roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Hebrew סִידּוּר.

Examples

  • Editing a siddur is a lot more difficult and time consuming when you are researching and debating changes to the siddur instead of just printing the traditional hebrew text.

    Warning: Artscroll Women’s Siddur | Jewschool

  • He posed a challenge for every Jew to find himself or herself inside the siddur, which is filled with beautiful poetry, meaningful philosophy and provocative theology.

    Articles

  • I slink away to "SOC 4," and a class about how the siddur came into being, and after head over to get some tea in the Arts center, where I bump into Silvia Nacamulli, a 39-year-old Italian chef.

    Danna Harman: What I Learned At Limmud

  • I was part of the committee of mostly rabbis that created a siddur for Shabbat morning called Or Chadash.

    Marge Piercy: Statement

  • Tefillah (Prayer) contains poems specifically written for a siddur (prayer book).

    Marge Piercy: Statement

  • And on the bima, I face the ark and hold my siddur (prayer book) against my chest and think about my life.

    Kate Fridkis: Letting Atheists Pray, Too

  • And on the bima, I face the ark and hold my siddur (prayer book) against my chest and think about my life.

    Kate Fridkis: Letting Atheists Pray, Too

  • The peddler melammed [teacher], going from door to door with siddur and Humash in hand, teaching boys and girls their aleph-bet, or the Old World rabbi confronting scores of boys in a basement heder, stood in stark contrast to the modern public school, with its imposing building and its corps of well-trained American teachers.

    Education of Jewish Girls in the United States.

  • A typical heder enrolled forty to fifty boys, often in wretched physical quarters, after public school hours to learn mechanical reading of Hebrew, siddur, hummash, and Mishnah.

    Education of Jewish Girls in the United States.

  • While quite radical in his willingness to change the traditional siddur (book of daily prayers), he never thought to make the siddur gender-neutral.

    Mordecai Kaplan.

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