Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One of several things signified by a common term.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One of several things signified by a common term.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In logic, one of several characters (less properly also objects) signified by a common term.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin significatus, past participle of significare.

Examples

  • In the first case, the spoken term is the same but there are two distinct significates or intellectual conceptions; in the second case, both the spoken term and the significate are the same.

    Medieval Theories of Analogy

  • We have become a society of morons to think this is some kind of significate event!

    Will crash hurt Tiger Woods' career?

  • Albert's semantics becomes innovative when he admits that propositions have their own proper significate, which is not identical to that of their terms (see especially his Questions on the Posterior Analytics I, qq.

    Albert of Saxony

  • While I have no objection to trying to get that trophy or the world record in fishing or hunting for that matter, it can create a significate misnomer about the sport and what we are all out there doing.

    Dropping The Hammer (Again)

  • It is perhaps plausible to interpret an existing primary significate as analogous to a “fact” in the modern philosophical sense.

    Insolubles

  • A proposition is false in this second sense if and only if its primary significate fails to exist.

    Insolubles

  • If the word ˜false™ in a is taken in the third sense, therefore, a's primary significate does exist, since it is a fact that a is false in the third sense.

    Insolubles

  • For some thinkers, the primary significate of a common noun was the common nature, and the secondary significate was the thing having that nature.

    Medieval Theories of Analogy

  • What was needed was a way of allowing the concept to enjoy some kind of unity, while allowing the word to have a significate that was not a simple common nature.

    Medieval Theories of Analogy

  • Thus for Wodeham, each proposition has its own total significate that is only complexly signifiable (complexe significabile), so that Socrates's-being-seated and Socrates's-not-being-seated are two different things, the objects of scientific knowledge.

    Gregory of Rimini

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