Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Any of numerous compounds containing silicon, oxygen, and one or more metals; a salt of silicic acid.
  • noun Any of a large group of minerals, forming over 90 percent of the earth's crust, that consist of SiO2 or SiO4 groupings combined with one or more metals and sometimes hydrogen.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A salt of silicic acid.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Chem.) A salt of silicic acid.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun chemistry Any salt of silica or of one of the silicic acids; any mineral composed of silicates

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a salt or ester derived from silicic acid

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • “Clay” as a mineral refers to a “cousin” of micas; that is, a silicate mineral containing structural sheets of silica tetrahedra tetrahedral arrangements of one Si and 4 Oxygen atoms, with the Oxygen atoms at the 4 corners.

    Open thread: questions and explanations - The Panda's Thumb

  • That kind of planet would have to develop differently from Earth, Mars and Venus, so-called silicate planets made up mostly of silicon-oxygen compounds.

    2005 February 08 « worlds in a grain of sand

  • That kind of planet would have to develop differently from Earth, Mars and Venus, so-called silicate planets made up mostly of silicon-oxygen compounds.

    Diamond Planets? « worlds in a grain of sand

  • That kind of planet would have to develop differently from Earth, Mars and Venus, so-called silicate planets made up mostly of silicon-oxygen compounds.

    Diamond Planets?

  • That kind of planet would have to develop differently from Earth, Mars and Venus, so-called silicate planets made up mostly of silicon-oxygen compounds.

    Archive 2005-02-01

  • The principal ore mineral is uranophane, a hydrated calcium-uranium silicate, which is believed to be an oxidation product of pitchblende.

    The Economic Aspect of Geology

  • By theory, [20] 50 grams of quartz will require 88.5 grams of the carbonate, or 140 grams of the bicarbonate, to form sodium silicate, which is a glassy, easily-fusible substance, making a good slag.

    A Text-book of Assaying: For the Use of Those Connected with Mines.

  • Silica forms with lime a compound, calcium silicate, which is not very fusible; but when alumina and other oxides are present, as in clays and in most rocky substances, the addition of lime gives a very fusible slag.

    A Text-book of Assaying: For the Use of Those Connected with Mines.

  • If the bicarbonate is used, and heat is applied gradually, steam and carbonic acid are given off at a comparatively low temperature, and the carbonate is left; at a higher temperature (about 800° C., or a cherry-red heat) the carbonate fuses attacking the quartz, and giving off more carbonic acid; as the heat increases, and the attack on the quartz (which of itself is infusible) becomes complete, the whole mass settles down to a liquid sodium silicate, which is sufficiently fluid to allow the gold and lead to settle to the bottom.

    A Text-book of Assaying: For the Use of Those Connected with Mines.

  • If the child coughs it is given _bans-lochan_, which is said to be some kind of silicate found in bamboos.

    The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India - Volume IV of IV Kumhar-Yemkala

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