Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. simian; like a monkey

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to the Simiæ; monkeylike.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Same as simian.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin simia an ape.

Examples

  • The prophet Hud remonstrated; but his remonstrances went for nothing, and the indignant monarch and his courtiers suddenly found their visages simious, their tongues chattering, and their lower portions furnished with tails -- a species of transformation, which, so far as regards visage and tongue, is supposed to be not unfrequent among courtiers to this day.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 55, No. 341, March, 1844

  • I shall, in the meanwhile, call these simious narrow skulls of Switzerland

    On the Genesis of Species

  • There is a strong facial resemblance among the simious races -- _Simia

    Punchinello, Volume 1, No. 10, June 4, 1870

  • This malignant and terrible contortion, combined with the low forehead, blunt nose, and prognathous jaw gave the dead man a singularly simious and ape-like appearance, which was increased by his writhing, unnatural posture.

    A Study in Scarlet

  • This malignant and terrible contortion, combined with the low forehead, blunt nose, and prognathous jaw, gave the dead man a singularly simious and ape-like appearance, which was increased by. his writhing, unnatural posture.

    A Study in Scarlet

  • This malignant and terrible contortion, combined with the low forehead, blunt nose, and prognathous jaw, gave the dead man a singularly simious and ape-like appearance, which was increased by his writhing, unnatural posture.

    A Study in Scarlet

  • What, then, could better suit him than to compose a novel in which he might give full play to his simious humour, startle more hideously than ever his straighter-laced neighbours, defiantly defend his own character, and caricature whatever eccentric figure in the society around him might offer the most tempting butt for ridicule?

    Sterne

  • The simious ugliness of his face, the largeness of his nose, the long slit of his mouth, the hugeness of his ears, the conflicting jumble of his withered features disappeared.

    The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete Lourdes, Rome and Paris

  • Mr. Allen says {168b} that though Mr. Darwin gained "far wider general acceptance" for both the doctrine of descent in general, and for that of the descent of man from a simious or semi-simious ancestor in particular, "he laid no sort of claim to originality or proprietorship in either theory."

    Luck or Cunning?

  • Our semi-simious ancestors could gesticulate long before they could talk articulately.

    Life and Habit

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