Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A glycosinolate glycoside found in many brassicas and related plants, toxic in large quantities but also responsible for the pungent bite of horseradish and hot mustard

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A glucoside found in the seeds of black mustard (Brassica nigra, formerly Sinapis nigra) It resembles sinalbin, and consists of a potassium salt of myronic acid.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as potassium myronate (which see, under myronate).

Etymologies

Sinapis nigra and -in. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • When these vegetables are cut, chewed or digested, a sulfur-containing compound called sinigrin is brought into contact with the enzyme myrosinase, resulting in the release of glucose and breakdown products, including highly reactive compounds called isothiocyanates.

    The World's Healthiest Foods

  • The heat comes from sinigrin, a volatile, pungent compound similar to mustard oil in its intensity and effect.

    Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's horseradish recipes

  • Wasabi Wasabi is the enlarged stem of an East Asian cabbage relative that also accumulates sinigrin as a chemical defense.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • • Black mustard, Brassica nigra, is a Eurasian native, small and dark-hulled, with a high content of the defensive storage compound sinigrin and therefore a high pungency potential.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • One of the major types (sinigrin, also the major mustard precursor) tastes bitter itself but produces a nonbitter thiocyanate, while the other (progoitrin) is nonbitter but produces a bitter thiocyanate.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • It has large, brown seeds that contain somewhat less sinigrin than black mustard and therefore less potential pungency.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • Horseradish Horseradish is a west Asian cabbage relative, Armoracia rusticana, remarkable for large fleshy white roots rich in sinigrin and its volatile pungent compound.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • These substances may be natural constituents of the seeds, such as gossypol and cylopropenoid fatty acids in cottonseed, cyanogenetic glycoside in linseed, ricin in castor beans, sinigrin or sinalbin in mustard seed, saponin in shea nuts, the trypsin inhibitor in soyabeans, or toxic mould metabolites, such as aflatoxin, which may form if the seeds are allowed to spoil by moulds.

    Chapter 7

  • The irritating portion of sinalbin is much less volatile than the irritant in sinigrin, so little of white mustard’s pungency rises into the nose.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

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