Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of sling.
  • v. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of sling.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Palin slings mud, and practices "politics of personal destruction" and then turns around and says, "oh, no I didn't".

    Palin: 'The media will never understand'

  • In the few remaining hunter-gatherer cultures, women carry their children in slings for their first few years of life, nursing them through the wildest days of toddlerhood.

    Parents' fear factor: A short toddle into the danger zone

  • And someone pointed out to me that it is one of the very few, if not only, books that show babies being carried in slings and being breastfed, as well as many other ways of doing things.

    Archive 2006-07-01

  • Soon two officers carrying their arms in slings made their appearance, and I more fully began to realize that something terrible had taken place.

    At Gettysburg, or, What a Girl Saw and Heard of the Battle: A True Narrative

  • William Rapetti had been offered eight new straps - called "slings" - to use on the crane tower only moments before the collapse, but turned them down and proceeded with the old slings, DA Robert Morgenthau said, calling the alleged corner-cutting "shocking" and

    NY Post: News

  • I counted three people with splinted arms in slings (see freezing rain, above), and some poor guy had dropped an ice auger on his foot (imagine a wicked sharp corkscrew-shaped steel blade about 3 feet long, handily topped with a small but heavy gasoline engine.

    Archive 2010-01-01

  • (I’m now signed off for a month & in slings both sides, awaiting the HR PDR Stasi sickness action plan and 12mth freeze on post applications when I return to duty, but thats another story I’m sure) Vasbyt for now, Lt V. on September 23, 2009 at 9: 51 am Angry Rozzer

    Who Said I Lied? (because I never) « POLICE INSPECTOR BLOG

  • He undipped Leroux's snake-clasp belt, tugged the sword slings free from the body, and strapped the scabbard over his own scabbard.

    Sharpe's Sword

  • He unclipped Leroux's snake-clasp belt, tugged the sword slings free from the body, and strapped the scabbard over his own scabbard.

    Sharpe's Sword

  • In later days the tops were armed with light guns, of the sorts known as slings and fowlers; but top-fighting with firearms was dangerous, as the gunners carried lighted matches, and there was always a risk of sparks, from the match, or from the wads, setting fire to the sails.

    On the Spanish Main Or, Some English forays on the Isthmus of Darien.

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