Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Pottery coated or decorated with slip.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A type of pottery identified by its primary decorating process where slip is placed onto the dry surface by dipping, painting or splashing.

Etymologies

slip +‎ ware (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • A slipware Scottish terrier, from the "things I found in my mother-in-law's house series."

    Photo of the Day: Scottie, Beaming Up

  • There is a wide variety of ceramic ware types including Chinese import porcelain, tin-glazed wares, creamware, Staffordshire-style slipware and locally made stonewares and redwares.

    The City Hall Park Project - Artifact Summary

  • The vast array of artifacts from the site includes crystal glass, silver tableware, and Italian slipware.

    Loaded Guns, Barrels of Rum, and a Silk Ribbon

  • The majority of surface material we sampled this year was typical Hellenistic tableware including molded bowls, gray ware, and a precursor of the Sagalassos red slipware.

    Interactive Dig Sagalassos 2003 - Survey Conclusions

  • Sagalassos red slipware sherds found in front of the main quarry face date from the early Imperial period and may constitute a terminus ante quem for the exploitation of the quarry.

    Interactive Dig Sagalassos - Geological Survey Report 1

  • It also includes a “new items” page and a section with the ceramics of Irma Starr, who makes slipware using the techniques employed in the museum’s Burnap Collection.

    Kansas City Star: Front Page

  • It also includes a "new items" page and a section with the ceramics of Irma Starr, who makes slipware using the techniques employed in the museum's Burnap Collection.

    Kansas City Star: Front Page

  • Notoriously difficult to date because of its ubiquity, this particular specimen of redware, characterized as Philadelphia-style slipware (Affleck et al. 2004, pg. 7.85) can be reasonably dated to the mid 18th century.

    Museum Blogs

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