Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • In a speculative manner; as or by means of speculation, in either the intellectual or the material sense.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adverb In a speculative manner.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adverb with speculation; in a speculative manner

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Rhodan seemed to pronounce the word speculatively as he looked at Pucky.

    Vagabond of Space

  • He glanced at the bars of the balcony again – speculatively.

    CROSSING THE LINE • by Avis Hickman-Gibb

  • My friend said Verne's science was wrong, but I defended Verne for writing "speculatively" with the knowledge available to him for that time.

    Links On Lady Authors, Literary Critics, And Scientific Accuracy in Science Fiction

  • My friend said Verne's science was wrong, but I defended Verne for writing "speculatively" with the knowledge available to him for that time.

    Archive 2008-05-01

  • The chummy with Labour production company that "speculatively" registered Gordon Brown leadership domains in advance of the non-existent contest, then said it was off their own back but did eventually find themsleves the owners of the domain that Gordon eventually used?

    Archive 2007-09-01

  • Toddles watched him go -- kind of speculatively, kind of reproachfully.

    The Boy Scouts Book of Campfire Stories

  • An aide later insisted Mr Ainsworth was speaking "speculatively", but bookmakers suspended betting on the election date in response.

    icNewcastle

  • The group's director of government affairs, Kathleen Sgamma, said the BLM's climate change review shouldn't hold up the leases too long because they were acquired speculatively, meaning there's no guarantee of drilling.

    Spokesman.com: Latest stories

  • “Good,” the Blade said, turning to examine Max and Alexander speculatively.

    Crimson Wind

  • It was not cultivated as a plant until the 17th century long after Elizabeth I, and then only speculatively, and mainly as a possible home-grown substitute for the expensive rhubarb root imported from the east and used as a purgative and laxative.

    Letters: Rosbifs, rhubarb and culinary history

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