Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Simple past tense and past participle of sphere.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A quelling job, and measured with his hands sphered into a circle, the muscles jettisoned to illness.

    The Best American Poetry 2008

  • As they go about their work, they can count on the support which must and will be given to them by their partners within our multi-sphered system of government.

    ANC Today

  • As they go about their work, they can count on the support which must and will be given to them by their partners within our multi-sphered system of government.

    ANC Today

  • There is a kind of nature, not artistic, not spiritual, in no way emotional, nor yet unduly philosophical, that is nevertheless a sphered content of life; not crystalline, perhaps, and yet not utterly dark — an agate temperament, cloudy and strange.

    The Titan

  • The sphered lamps of day and night, revealing 4785

    The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley

  • Blotting its sphered stars with supernatural night.

    The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley

  • For sphered in foaming silver, and with coral-crowned head.

    Collected Poems

  • There are no highly wrought amplifications of imaginative passions to be found in its condensed pages, but every word is in itself a drop of gall, reflecting from its sphered surface a world of grief, of agony.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 6, No 3, September 1864 Devoted To Literature And National Policy

  • But from many of the associations of the stage, from nearly all actors and actresses, and from all green-room loungers, she instinctively recoiled, and held herself haughtily aloof from the motley little world behind the scenes, -- apparently by no effort, but as sphered apart by the atmosphere of refinement and superiority which enveloped her.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 04, No. 23, September, 1859

  • The perfect freedom from the universal Yankee necessity of motion, with which the brown, small hands fell before her, was as thoroughly a part of her as the strange Indian scent which clung to everything she touched, and sphered her like the atmosphere of another world.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol 6, No 5, November 1864 Devoted To Literature And National Policy

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