Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See whorl.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Without having any size given in the article, I think it is a spindle-whorl!

    More on the Zaraysk Stone-Age Sculptures

  • A rude spindle-whorl shows that they knew how to weave stuffs for their clothing, and the numerous buttons, fasteners, and belts prove that the clothes were fitted to the wearer, and not mere shapeless sacks.

    English Villages

  • The querns and spindle-whorl probably belonged to the Celts, or Britons, before the advent of the Roman legions; and that these people were the inhabitants of the Hampshire pit dwellings is proved by the presence of a British gold coin which is recognised by numismatists as an imitation of the Greek stater of Philip

    English Villages

  • A rude spindle-whorl shows that they knew something of weaving, and two bored stones were evidently buttons or dress-fasteners.

    English Villages

  • The spindle-whorl is evidence that they could spin thread; the mealing stones show that they knew how to cultivate corn; and the bones of the animals found in their dwellings testify to the fact that they were not in the wild state of primitive hunters, but possessed herds of cows and goats and other domestic animals.

    English Villages

  • It yields delicately fine pottery and a spindle-whorl, so that a woman must have taken refuge here, and here sat spinning and looking down from this dizzy height on the ruffians ravaging the valley below and setting fire to her house.

    Castles and Cave Dwellings of Europe

  • Hither ascended a _cantonnier_ when the new road was made up the valley, and here he found chipped flints of primeval man, a polished celt, a scrap of Samian ware, and in a niche at the side sealed up with stalactite, a tiny earthenware pitcher 2-1/2 inches high, a leaden spindle-whorl, some shells, and a toy sheep-bell.

    Castles and Cave Dwellings of Europe

  • Plan the recess were large Red Polished jugs, a Red Polished incised pyxis (141), a spindle-whorl and a bronze pin.

    Archaeologia, or, Miscellaneous tracts relating to antiquity [microform]

  • The top of this object appears to be of the same form as spindle-whorl of type IV (pi. ux, 9) although the stem seems to be much thicker than a real one to judge from the diameter of the hole through the spindle-whorl brought into comparison.

    Archaeologia, or, Miscellaneous tracts relating to antiquity [microform]

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