Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of spinet.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • This country is about a game-changing guarantee that equal room will be made for Latino socialists, disgruntled lesbian spinsters, foul-mouthed Jewish comics and even, dare I say it, for metrosexual half-Canadian art critics with a fondness for offal, spinets and kilts.

    Norman Rockwell exhibit opens at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

  • Somewhere out there lies a wasteland the size of Nebraska piled thirty feet high with spinets and baby grands, summer suns and winter frosts peeling their veneer off in curls and loosening the ivory of keys and snapping wires that lash out at the deaf air with one last, long, despairing B flat.

    WASN'T THE GRASS GREENER A Curmudgeon's Fond Memories

  • The old spinets and harpsichords, with their charming inlaid cases, were beautiful, but they gave forth only tinkly sounds.

    The House in Good Taste

  • This can be done through the piano factory; but in the case of redecorating a room, one can easily get some independent artist to do this work, a man who has made a study of the decorations on old spinets in palaces, private mansions and museums.

    The Art of Interior Decoration

  • As there is no record of spinets, or virginals, having been used at

    New Discoveries at Jamestown Site of the First Successful English Settlement in America

  • My father in those times fashioned wonderful organs with pipes of wood, spinets the fairest and most excellent which then could be seen, viols and lutes and harps of the most beautiful and perfect construction.

    The Autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini

  • My father in those times fashioned wonderful organs with pipes of wood, spinets the fairest and most excellent which then could be seen, viols and lutes and harps of the most beautiful and perfect construction.

    V

  • Vermeer and Terburg immortalised Dutch ladies at their spinets; Albert

    A Wanderer in Holland

  • No mathematical instrument maker was to be found in Glasgow, but Watt entered the service of a kind of jack-of-all-trades, who called himself an "optician" and sold and mended spectacles, repaired fiddles, tuned spinets, made fishing-rods and tackle, etc.

    James Watt

  • During the eighteenth century, when Edinburgh was almost more completely the centre of society than ever before, the old tunes were sung by ladies as much as by maid-servants, and the delicate old spinets performed a soft accompaniment to ballads of the "Ewebuchting" and of the "Corn Rigs," and prolonged the pathetic notes of "Waly, waly" and the trembling wail of the "Flowers of the Forest" in the finest houses as in the humblest.

    Royal Edinburgh Her Saints, Kings, Prophets and Poets

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