Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of spread-eagle.
  • adj. In a spread eagle position.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Being in a position with the arms and legs extended fully.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He held on with his one hand, spread-eagled on the rock face.

    Gideon’s war

  • Because Harry is tied down to a stainless steel surgical table that's been wheeled in, spread-eagled, naked.

    Monkeytown prologue/chapter first

  • She came home from work one day and crouched beside me on the floor where I sat spread-eagled with a canvas on my knees.

    My Other Mother is a Ferrari

  • It was Dana's cool poise that saved him from being spread-eagled and flogged when two of his mates were so treated; it was his lack of abandon that prevented him from taking up permanently with the sea, that prevented him from seeing more than one poetical spot, and more than one romantic spot on all the coast of Old California.

    A CLASSIC OF THE SEA

  • Another thing is the story about the guy suspended upside down, spread-eagled, penis in his mouth, and saying

    Heroes or Villains?

  • They were all so far away, but you always knew when a person was coming off the building because they all came down the same way--spread-eagled, turning, falling fast, and disappearing behind the Woolworth Building.

    The Wall Street Journal Editorial Page: Sept. 12, 2001

  • The first thing I notice, on stepping into Dr Pierre Dukan's consulting room in a beautiful old building in an expensive part of Paris is the huge painting of a naked woman, spread-eagled with everything on show, on one of the walls.

    The Saturday interview: Dukan diet creator Pierre Dukan | Emine Saner

  • I was spread-eagled, and thumbed-up, and privily beaten by the stupid guards whose totality of intelligence was only just sufficient to show them that I was different from them and not so stupid.

    Chapter 2

  • They are spread-eagled, as if blown there by a huge wind, and aghast.

    Decade; The Tempest; The Kitchen; Parade – review

  • There were Indians that ran away, and when they were caught they were brought back and spread-eagled before the fort, where they and their tribe learned the efficacy of the knout.

    Lost Face

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