Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of springald.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • “Pages lie to their masters by right of custom,” said the citizen; “and you write yourself in that band, though I think you be among the oldest of such springalds; but to me you must speak truth, if you would not have it end in the whipping-post.”

    The Fortunes of Nigel

  • And graybeards laugh when pelted with snow by springalds flung, and frozen hearts are melted, and ancient hearts are young.

    Rippling Rhymes

  • When [35] Zein ul Asnam saw himself in this great might and wealth, and he young in years, he inclined unto prodigality and to the converse of springalds like himself and fell to squandering vast sums upon his pleasures and left governance and concern for his subjects.

    Alaeddin and the Enchanted Lamp

  • Because all the world agrees to believe that such springalds as the Duca di Lodi can't take care of themselves.

    A Siren

  • The severity of his morals contrasted so remarkably with the lax and dissolute manner of the young lords and nobles in the courts which he frequented, that these young springalds would sometimes sneer and call him Monk and

    Rebecca and Rowena; a romance upon romance

  • "I would, Sam," said the wild youth to his companion, "that I had some of my mother Macclesfield's gold, to enable us to eat of those cates and mingle with yon springalds and beaux."

    Burlesques

  • Old men's heads, it is true, are frequently white, though more frequently bald, and their blood is not so hot as when they were springalds.

    Recreations of Christopher North, Volume 2

  • You women go falling enamoured of young springalds and covet their love, for that you see them somewhat fresher of colour and blacker of beard and they go erect and jaunty and dance and joust, all which things they have had who are somewhat more in years, ay, and these know that which those have yet to learn.

    The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio

  • The severity of his morals contrasted so remarkably with the lax and dissolute manner of the young lords and nobles in the courts which he frequented, that these young springalds would sometimes sneer and call him Monk and Milksop; but his courage in the day of battle was so terrible and admirable, that I promise you the youthful libertines did not sneer THEN; and the most reckless of them often turned pale when they couched their lances to follow Ivanhoe.

    Burlesques

  • “I would, Sam,” said the wild youth to his companion, “that I had some of my mother Macclesfield’s gold, to enable us to eat of those cates and mingle with yon springalds and beaux.”

    Novels by Eminent Hands

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