Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See pine.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The Korean Pine Pinus koraiensis appears in the lower part of the belt of fir-spruce forests and in the transition strip of the pine-spruce and spruce-pine forest forms.

    Central Sikhote-Alin, Russian Federation

  • An ink prepared after the method laid down by this monk, assuming that he referred to the spruce-pine, while troublesome to write with, would be almost as lasting as "Indian" ink and would be most difficult to erase from parchment into which it would be absorbed due to its alcoholic qualities.

    Forty Centuries of Ink

  • A kingly spruce-pine gave the near note for a perspective which went away across a valley of cornfields to heaping and distant mountains.

    The Call of the Cumberlands

  • Flagstaff, a new town with a lively lumber industry, in the midst of a spruce-pine forest which occupies the broken country through which the road passes for over fifty miles.

    Our Italy

  • On looking into the valley below, to their great joy they beheld some clumps of willows, and good-sized trees of poplar, birch, and spruce-pine (_Pinus alba_), and passing down the hill, the travellers soon stood in their midst.

    The Young Voyageurs Boy Hunters in the North

  • There was a lake and a considerable skirting of timber around it -- consisting, as we have said, of willows, poplars, spruce-pine, and dwarf birch-trees.

    Popular Adventure Tales

  • On looking into the valley below, to their great joy they beheld some clumps of willows, and good-sized trees of poplar, birch, and spruce-pine, and passing down the hill, the travellers soon stood in their midst.

    Popular Adventure Tales

  • At this village the river widens to nearly a mile in extent; the low grounds become wider, and they as well as the mountains on each side are covered with pine, spruce-pine, cottonwood, a species of ash, and some alder.

    First Across the Continent; The Story of The Exploring Expedition of Lewis and Clark in 1804-5-6

  • Few vegetables of any kind were seen; and the trees which chiefly grew here, were the Canadian and spruce-pine, and some of them tolerably large.

    A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 16

  • We observed many trees and plants common at New Zealand; and, in particular, the flax-plant, which is rather more luxuriant here than in any part of that country; but the chief produce is a sort of spruce-pine, which grows in great abundance, and to a large size, many of the trees being as thick, breast high, as two men could fathom, and exceedingly straight and tall.

    A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels — Volume 14

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