Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of squireen.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Much has been written about the useless, dissipated lives of these middlemen or "squireens"; and no doubt it is to a great extent true, although, like everything else in Ireland, it has been exaggerated.

    Is Ulster Right?

  • When this fact came to be known at Chatteris, all the folks in the place were set in commotion: High Church and Low Church, half-pay captains and old maids and dowagers, sporting squireens of the viciniage, farmers, tradesmen, and factory people — all the population in and round about the little place.

    The History of Pendennis

  • Catholic families, beaten down by the Penal Laws,30 despised by Irish Protestants, by the few English Catholics they met, had but little choice as to where they picked their brides; boys, on one side of old family, grew up squireens, halfsirs, peasants who had lost their tradition, gentlemen who had lost theirs.

    Collected Works of W. B. Yeats Volume III Autobiographies

  • Catholic families, beaten down by the Penal Laws,30 despised by Irish Protestants, by the few English Catholics they met, had but little choice as to where they picked their brides; boys, on one side of old family, grew up squireens, halfsirs, peasants who had lost their tradition, gentlemen who had lost theirs.

    Collected Works of W. B. Yeats Volume III Autobiographies

  • Catholic families, beaten down by the Penal Laws,30 despised by Irish Protestants, by the few English Catholics they met, had but little choice as to where they picked their brides; boys, on one side of old family, grew up squireens, halfsirs, peasants who had lost their tradition, gentlemen who had lost theirs.

    Collected Works of W. B. Yeats Volume III Autobiographies

  • Catholic families, beaten down by the Penal Laws,30 despised by Irish Protestants, by the few English Catholics they met, had but little choice as to where they picked their brides; boys, on one side of old family, grew up squireens, halfsirs, peasants who had lost their tradition, gentlemen who had lost theirs.

    Collected Works of W. B. Yeats Volume III Autobiographies

  • Catholic families, beaten down by the Penal Laws,30 despised by Irish Protestants, by the few English Catholics they met, had but little choice as to where they picked their brides; boys, on one side of old family, grew up squireens, half-sirs, peasants who had lost their tradition, gentlemen who had lost theirs.

    Autobiographies

  • Catholic families, beaten down by the Penal Laws,30 despised by Irish Protestants, by the few English Catholics they met, had but little choice as to where they picked their brides; boys, on one side of old family, grew up squireens, half-sirs, peasants who had lost their tradition, gentlemen who had lost theirs.

    Autobiographies

  • At any rate, there was "society," smart young officers and rising politicians, instead of clodhopping squireens and village boors, to talk to, and shops where the new fashions could be examined, and theatres with real London actors and actresses.

    The Magnificent Montez From Courtesan to Convert

  • Mr Gunning had took himself off to Castle Coote, his beggarly place in the country, where he could dice and drink in peace with the neighboring squireens, and live off claret and the skinny fowls that pecked about the avenue; and she had the weight of the children on her spare shoulders.

    The Ladies A Shining Constellation of Wit and Beauty

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