Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of stableman.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • As it turned out, we missed that tide, and did not start till two in the next morning; but I was oblivious of such a detail, having been made one of the two "stablemen" of my sub-division, a post which was to last for a week, and kept me in constant attendance on the horses down below; so that I might just as well have been in a very stuffy stable on shore, for all I saw of the run down Channel.

    In the Ranks of the C.I.V.

  • But when you have soon in how few minutes a horse can be groomed and made to look as bright as a mirror by our enormous cylindrical brushes set in rotation by mechanism; in how short a time our scouring-machines and water-service can cleanse the largest stable of dung and all sorts of filth; and how the fodder is automatically supplied to the animals, you will not only understand how it is that we can keep horses cheaply, but you will also perceive that in Freeland even the "stablemen" are cultured gentlemen, as deserving of respect and as much respected as everybody else. '

    Freeland A Social Anticipation

  • The Oakland harness-washers and stablemen, with few exceptions, had gone out with the teamsters.

    CHAPTER XI

  • One of the stablemen who had not gone out, Henderson by name, worked at Billy's stables.

    CHAPTER XI

  • He hires the stablemen, and he makes sure none stays long enough to wonder how old he is.

    Following Magic

  • He heard the sound of retching – one of the Trieve stablemen.

    In Gordath Wood: Writer Patrice Sarath » Gordath Wood: Crae

  • She was the favourite of her father and of the stablemen.

    Vanity Fair

  • It owned over one hundred and fifty cars of the old-fashioned, straw-strewn, no-stove type, and over one thousand horses; it employed one hundred and seventy conductors, one hundred and sixty drivers, a hundred stablemen, and blacksmiths, harness-makers, and repairers in interesting numbers.

    The Titan

  • Riding into the stables, he dismounted and lifted Penny down, then watched as she told the stablemen and grooms that she was home to stay.

    A Lady of His Own

  • Sir Percival himself dismissed the grooms and stablemen, sending them, with all the horses but one, to London.

    The Woman in White

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.