Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A farmyard in which stacks of hay etc. are stored.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A yard or inclosure for stacks of hay or grain.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A yard or inclosure for stacks of hay or grain.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

stack +‎ yard

Examples

  • The marvellous ant-hill called a stackyard would not permit Jack to wait for his mother.

    The Wind Before the Dawn

  • The Donnithorne Arms stood at the entrance of the village, and a small farmyard and stackyard which flanked it, indicating that there was a pretty take of land attached to the inn, gave the traveller a promise of good feed for himself and his horse, which might well console him for the ignorance in which the weather-beaten sign left him as to the heraldic bearings of that ancient family, the Donnithornes.

    Adam Bede

  • Fowls raced from the stackyard, birds rustled from the trees.

    The Prussian Officer and Other Stories

  • Mr Innes was a sure hand at the fork in the stackyard, and the man on the stack and the man on the cart had to look out.

    Cattle and Cattle-breeders

  • Behind the stackyard at the Traveller's Delight the ground dipped down into a hollow, which, even in daylight, was completely screened from the view of any one within the house or about the yard by a great clump or patch of scraggy furze bushes.

    Two Little Travellers A Story for Girls

  • Step by step they stole along until they reached the greater security of the stackyard.

    Two Little Travellers A Story for Girls

  • Then they raced each other along the breezy headland, across the sweet-smelling stubble field, through the stackyard and the orchard, until, flushed and breathless, they stood beside the mistress in the cool, red-tiled dairy of Copsley Farm.

    Two Little Travellers A Story for Girls

  • He carefully laid the still sleeping Joan under the shelter of a hayrick in the stackyard behind the inn; and charging Darby neither to make a noise nor leave her alone, no matter what might happen, the dwarf crept cautiously forward -- stealthy in his movements as a cat stalking a mouse -- to ascertain whether there was any safe cover to which he could convey the children.

    Two Little Travellers A Story for Girls

  • They gathered apples in the orchard, hazel nuts in the copse, late blackberries from the hedge at the back of the stackyard; and they watched the pigs at their afternoon meal until Joan turned away in disgust, declaring that "the dirty fings should be teached better manners, and made to sup their pow'idge wif a spoon!"

    Two Little Travellers A Story for Girls

  • As Jack hesitated between his great desire to see the marvel of the stackyard and his desire to show as much manliness as his mother evidently expected of him, there was a noise on the doorstep and Hepsie came smilingly in.

    The Wind Before the Dawn

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