Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A strong desire to go on the stage, or to be an actor or actress.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He advised her to drop the concert idea and dwell wholly upon the possibility of opera as a lure: only the dramatic form and setting could compete successfully in a case of stage-fever like that.

    Elsie Marley, Honey

  • But the stage-fever was in his blood, and after a short retirement, we find him, in 1771, investing a part of his wife's fortune in a share in the Crow Street

    Little Memoirs of the Nineteenth Century

  • And without pausing Alice rippled on, ` ` You ought to have seen me when I had the stage-fever!

    Alice Adams

  • But the stage-fever was in his blood, and after a short retirement, we find him, in 1771, investing a part of his wife's fortune in a share in the Crow Street Theatre,

    Little Memoirs of the Nineteenth Century

  • As for the minor parts, the gentlemen who personated them gave a capital rendering of supers suffering from stage-fever.

    My Lady Nicotine A Study in Smoke

  • It is a curious thing, but true, that our herd-boys and others were sometimes struck with the stage-fever.

    Auld Licht Idylls

  • It is a curious thing, but true, that our herd-boys and others were sometimes struck with the stage-fever.

    Auld Licht Idyls

  • Charles take a glass to Evelyn, who was shivering with a sharp attack of stage-fever in an arm-chair, looking over her part.

    The Danvers Jewels, and Sir Charles Danvers

  • Alice rippled on, "You ought to have seen ME when I had the stage-fever!

    Alice Adams

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