Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The bottom of a stair.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In that day and in that hour I bid thee remember how we stood together erst at the stair-foot of the

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • While she ironed she heard him coming down stairs; he stopped to put on his boots at the stair-foot, where he always left them, and then came on into the living-room where she was ironing, passing through it towards the door, this being the only way from the staircase to the outside of the house.

    Life's Little Ironies

  • But, once at the stair-foot, she threw aside the spell and recovered her sensible and workaday self.

    Lay Morals

  • The servants in the kitchen, hearing the strain, stole to the stair-foot to listen: even old Helstone, as he walked in the garden, pondering over the unaccountable and feeble nature of women, stood still amongst his borders to catch the mournful melody more distinctly.

    Shirley, by Charlotte Bronte

  • Then the knights parters of the lists took up Sir Mador, and led him to his tent, and the other knight went straight to the stair-foot where sat King Arthur; and by that time was the queen come to the king, and either kissed other heartily.

    Le Morte d'Arthur: Sir Thomas Malory's book of King Arthur and of his noble knights of the Round table

  • She went up the brick step into the front room, that still had its little shop counter and its bundles of goods, and she called from the stair-foot.

    The Prussian Officer and Other Stories

  • Beyond the stair-foot was a hall, and going down from it a sunken shrine.

    The King Must Die

  • He jumped for the stair-foot, and closed the door behind him; and as he snatched his candle and fled upward, the stillness of the night was broken by the sound of urgent footsteps approaching the house.

    Pudd'nhead Wilson

  • Miss Mary, in great tribulation, was waiting on them at the stair-foot, her face, with all its trouble in dark and throbbing lines, lit up by the lamp above the merchant's door.

    Gilian The Dreamer His Fancy, His Love and Adventure

  • A princess, mind you, and she looked all the more that because her uncle met me at the stair-foot as I was going in.

    Gilian The Dreamer His Fancy, His Love and Adventure

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