Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Of or pertaining to a station.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective rare Of or pertaining to a station.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Of or relating to a station.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin stationalis: compare French stationnale.

Examples

  • 1 After the recitation of a prayer there, the assembly proceeded to another church referred to as the stational church.

    Latest Articles

  • 1 After the recitation of a prayer there, the assembly proceeded to another church referred to as the stational church.

    Latest Articles

  • 1 After the recitation of a prayer there, the assembly proceeded to another church referred to as the stational church.

    Latest Articles

  • 1 After the recitation of a prayer there, the assembly proceeded to another church referred to as the stational church.

    Latest Articles

  • Under John Paul II, the Congregation for Divine Worship in 1988 stated that "the Roman tradition of the 'stational' churches can be recommended as a model for gathering the faithful in one place … at the tombs of the saints, or in the principle churches of the city or sanctuaries, or some place of pilgrimage which has a special significance for the diocese".

    Latest Articles

  • Under John Paul II, the Congregation for Divine Worship in 1988 stated that "the Roman tradition of the 'stational' churches can be recommended as a model for gathering the faithful in one place … at the tombs of the saints, or in the principle churches of the city or sanctuaries, or some place of pilgrimage which has a special significance for the diocese".

    Latest Articles

  • Under John Paul II, the Congregation for Divine Worship in 1988 stated that "the Roman tradition of the 'stational' churches can be recommended as a model for gathering the faithful in one place … at the tombs of the saints, or in the principle churches of the city or sanctuaries, or some place of pilgrimage which has a special significance for the diocese".

    Latest Articles

  • Under John Paul II, the Congregation for Divine Worship in 1988 stated that "the Roman tradition of the 'stational' churches can be recommended as a model for gathering the faithful in one place … at the tombs of the saints, or in the principle churches of the city or sanctuaries, or some place of pilgrimage which has a special significance for the diocese".

    Latest Articles

  • Their origin is ascribed by De Vert to the stational processions in Rome, when the deacons wore chasubles or 'mantles', in place of the customary dalmatics. (p. 129)

    Use, History and Development of the "Planeta Plicata" or Folded Chasuble

  • In the sixth or seventh century, perhaps a little earlier, the chief acolyte of the stational church, carrying the sacred chrism covered with a veil, and, directing the procession, preceded on foot the horse on which the Pope rode.

    The Seven Acolytes at Papal Mass

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