Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The chamber in which the slide-valve of a steam-engine works. See cuts under passenger-engine, rockdrill, and slide-valve.
  • noun In calico-printing, a metallic vessel or tank in which printed cloths are steamed to fix their colors.
  • noun A name incorrectly given to a steam-chamber or dome of a land-boiler, or to the steam-chimney of a marine boiler.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The clamors of the bar soon brought about … amendment … and left the code … a great cumbrous piece of machinery without driving-wheels, steam-chest or boiler, propelled along by the typical slow oxteam.9

    A History of American Law

  • The clamors of the bar soon brought about … amendment … and left the code … a great cumbrous piece of machinery without driving-wheels, steam-chest or boiler, propelled along by the typical slow oxteam.9

    A History of American Law

  • The clamors of the bar soon brought about … amendment … and left the code … a great cumbrous piece of machinery without driving-wheels, steam-chest or boiler, propelled along by the typical slow oxteam.9

    A History of American Law

  • By this simple arrangement the pump is rendered positive in its action; that is, it will instantly start and continue working the moment steam is admitted to the steam-chest, while at the same time the piston is enabled to move as slowly as the nature of the duty may require.

    Mechanical Drawing Self-Taught

  • The hand wheel and rod to the right are to operate the stop-cock for turning on and off the steam to the steam-chest.

    Mechanical Drawing Self-Taught

  • The cut-off valve is behind the main valve: the mechanism for operating the valves is on the outside of the steam-chest, and easily accessible.

    Lippincott's Magazine, December 1878

  • It involves the steam-chest and the slide-valve, and all other kinds of steam valves that have been invented, including the Corliss cut-off, and all others that are akin to it in object and action.

    Steam, Steel and Electricity

  • A view of the steam-chest side of the cylinder is given in Figure 323, and a horizontal cross section of the cylinder, the steam-chest and the valves, is shown in Figure 324.

    Mechanical Drawing Self-Taught

  • The first steam locomotive that we know about, like that of Stephenson, was a crude mechanism with a primitive boiler and steam-chest and drive-wheels, and as a whole it had but a low degree of efficiency measured by our modern standard; but as time went on inventive genius changed one little part after another until greater and greater efficiency was obtained, and at the present time we find many varied products of locomotive evolution.

    The Doctrine of Evolution Its Basis and Its Scope

  • Steam from the steam-chest, J, is therefore entering the right-hand end of the main cylinder through the ports E and H, and the exhaust is escaping through the ports H 1, E 1, K and M, which causes the main piston A to move from right to left.

    Mechanical Drawing Self-Taught

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