Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of steamboatman.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And I was some years a Mississippi pilot, and familiarly knew all the different kinds of steamboatmen — a race apart, and not like other folk.

    Mark Twain: A Biography

  • And I was some years a Mississippi pilot, and familiarly knew all the different kinds of steamboatmen -- a race apart, and not like other folk.

    Mark Twain, a Biography. Complete

  • And I was some years a Mississippi pilot, and familiarly knew all the different kinds of steamboatmen -- a race apart, and not like other folk.

    Mark Twain, a Biography — Volume II, Part 2: 1886-1900

  • The deck-hands were all soldiers -- perhaps half a dozen of them in all -- the only steamboatmen on board being one pilot, four engineers, and as many firemen.

    Frank on the Lower Mississippi

  • There was frequent racing between the packets on the Ohio and Mississippi, and the frightful calamities from bursting boilers continued for a long time before public opinion quelled the boyish love of victory which tempted not only the steamboatmen but their passengers too.

    Stories Of Ohio

  • I had hoped to hunt up and talk with a hundred steamboatmen, but got so pleasantly involved in the social life of the town that I got nothing more than mere five-minute talks with a couple of dozen of the craft.

    Life on the Mississippi, Part 9.

  • I had hoped to hunt up and talk with a hundred steamboatmen, but got so pleasantly involved in the social life of the town that I got nothing more than mere five-minute talks with a couple of dozen of the craft.

    Life on the Mississippi, Part 11.

  • The trouble heretofore has been -- I am quoting remarks of planters and steamboatmen -- that the planters, although owning the land, were without cash capital; had to hypothecate both land and crop to carry on the business.

    Life on the Mississippi, Part 7.

  • There were several old steamboatmen along, and I learned from them a great deal of what had been happening to my former river friends during my long absence.

    Life on the Mississippi, Part 9.

  • In fact, so much is this the case, the waters of Red River have been driven down from toward the Calcasieu country, and the waters of the Black enter the Red some fifteen miles above the mouth of the former, a thing never before seen by even the oldest steamboatmen.

    Life on the Mississippi, Part 12.

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