Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A steeple-crowned hat.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The Marsh-wiggle took off his steeple-hat and bowed very stiffly.

    The Silver Chair

  • New England knew them, in band and steeple-hat, hanging and pressing to death helpless women, bewitched with witchcraft.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 05, No. 32, June, 1860

  • The one riding slightly in advance looked like a Puritan of the meaner sort, in his battered steeple-hat and cloak of rusty black.

    The Tavern Knight

  • In antiquarian museums, only two centuries hence, the steeple-hat will hang on the next peg to Franks and Company’s patent, antiquarians deciding which is uglier: and the Stulz swallow-tail, one may hope, will seem as incredible as any garment that ever made ridiculous the respectable back of man.

    Paras. 50-73

  • I have passed it many a day, looking with mischievous curiosity for the steeple-hat, to show that to some city friend, little thinking I must ever enter the house.

    The Entailed Hat Or, Patty Cannon's Times

  • "Roxy'll burn all the bell-crowns for her beau, and I'll bury the steeple-hat and you that cleans it, and the people will be so glad they'll set me free and I can go North."

    The Entailed Hat Or, Patty Cannon's Times

  • First comes the ancestor himself, in his black cloak, steeple-hat, and trunk-breeches, girt about the waist with a leathern belt, in which hangs his steel-hilted sword; he has a long staff in his hand, such as gentlemen in advanced life used to carry, as much for the dignity of the thing as for the support to be derived from it.

    The House of the Seven Gables

  • Additional particulars: of his age, which was of that standing middle sort you could only guess at; of his wide surtout; the colour of his trousers, fashion of his broad-brimmed steeple-hat, and so forth, we might report, but do not.

    Sartor Resartus, and On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and the Heroic in History

  • -- Something we would have given to see the little philosophical figure, with its steeple-hat and loose flowing skirts, and eyes in a fine frenzy,

    Sartor Resartus, and On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and the Heroic in History

  • First comes the ancestor himself, in his black cloak, steeple-hat, and trunk-breeches, girt about the waist with a leathern belt, in which hangs his steel-hilted sword; he has a long staff in his hand, such as gentlemen in advanced life used to carry, as much for the dignity of the thing as for the support to be derived from it.

    House of the Seven Gables

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