Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of steersman.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The chiefs rested from their paddles, save for the steersmen who kept the canoes bow-on to the wind and swell.

    THE BONES OF KAHEKILI

  • It is a dangerous place, a place where vagrants live, where "lost boys" roam the catacombs, and where the dark figure of Drood and his two steersmen usher Dickens on a gondola to the deepest recesses of Underworld.

    2009 Reading Year in Review

  • The opposition to the Constitution from the western counties would be “numerous & violent,” requiring “the utmost candor & prudence” to control—but Gorham noted that “some of our friends are not good steersmen.”

    Ratification

  • It is a dangerous place, a place where vagrants live, where “lost boys” roam the catacombs, and where the dark figure of Drood and his two steersmen usher Dickens on a gondola to the deepest recesses of Underworld.

    Archive 2009-02-01

  • For those two have perished by the fate they have met with; but among our host are steersmen yet, and many a one.

    The Argonautica

  • I of course had imagined that this open space from one side to the other was separated from the hold by a water-tight bulkhead, so that a sea entering might wash out at the further side, and do no more harm than give the steersmen a drenching.

    The Malay Archipelago

  • The tillers were not on deck, but entered the vessel through two square openings into a lower or half deck about three feet high, in which sit the two steersmen.

    The Malay Archipelago

  • Swiftly as the cutters flew over the sea, the tidings of their flight took wing ashore, and before the night swallowed up their distant sails, everybody on the land whom it concerned to know, knew as well as their steersmen what course they had laid.

    Mary Anerley

  • We passed huge black hulks of mouldering men-of-war, from the sterns of which trailed the dirty red flag, with the star and crescent; boats, manned with red-capped seamen, and captains and steersmen in beards and tarbooshes, passed continually among these old hulks, the rowers bending to their oars, so that at each stroke they disappeared bodily in the boat.

    Notes of a Journey From Cornhill to Grand Cairo

  • Ringsend: wigwams of brown steersmen and master mariners.

    Ulysses

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