Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found. Check out and contribute to the discussion of this word!

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Where he prepares to punish Custance and her friends for refusing him, there is a play on the word "stomacke" -- used for courage:

    History of English Humour, Vol. 1 (of 2) With an Introduction upon Ancient Humour

  • Lazaro, hurt not your selfe with leaning your stomacke on the Fat, and leave the cleansing of it to me.

    The Decameron

  • Ferando having lyen entranced three dayes and three nights, felt his stomacke well prepared to eate, and feeding very heartily, still saide; O my good Wife, O my loving Wife, long mayest thou live for this extraordinary kindnesse.

    The Decameron

  • The Abbot, who had a better stomacke to eate, then any will or desire to talke: although hee did it somewhat disdainfully, yet hee eate up both the toastes, and roundly dranke the Glasse of

    The Decameron

  • The Abbot pretending great admiration at this accident, called his Monkes about him, all labouring by rubbing his temples, throwing cold water and vinegar in his face, to revive him againe; alleaging that some fume or vapour in the stomacke, had thus over-awed his understanding faculties, and quite deprived him of life indeede.

    The Decameron

  • Master Guillaume hearing him speake so simply, returned him this answer: Sir, I cannot advise you in any thing, so rare or unseene as you talk of: but how to sneeze (after a new manner) upon a full and over-cloyed stomacke, to avoyde base humours that stupifie the braine, or other matters of the like quality.

    The Decameron

  • Physicke, and he commanded me to tell you, that the very best medicine, he could ever learne, against any disease in the stomacke, was this which he had provided for your Lordship, as an especial preparative, and which he should finde to be very comfortable.

    The Decameron

  • Lord, seeing you doe feele your stomacke so well, it is time you should come forth of the Infirmary.

    The Decameron

  • Downe he sate, with all this provision before him, and emptying his stomacke twice or thrice, of some clotted flegmes which seemed to offend it: even as the Gentlemen were passing by, he dranke one or two rouses of his Wine so heartily, and with such a pleasing appetite, as might have moved a longing (almost) in a dead man.

    The Decameron

  • Rome, and there either by some surfeit, excesse of feeding, or otherwise, his stomacke being grievously offended and pained; the

    The Decameron

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.