Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of stand up to.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A city that had shrugged off Etruscan adventurers, weathered a Gallic invasion, stood up to Hannibals charge, endured civil war, survived annual outbreaks of malaria, and fought its way to such power that it could think of itself as the head of the world, was afraid of a runaway gladiator.

    The Spartacus War

  • But my favorite Leo insult came when he was managing the Cubs and the weak-hitting Paul Popovich stood up to go into the game.

    Baseball’s Even Greater Insults

  • One was a young man, swathed in many layers of dust-coloured fabric; as we approached he stood up to thrust his wide, callused feet into a pair of once-black shoes that lacked laces and were far too big for him, but were the necessary recognition of an Occasion.

    O Jerusalem

  • When he stood up to leave, she looked at him imploringly.

    The Empty Family

  • When a member of the L.bour Opposition, Mr. Arthur Greenwood, stood up to speak Mr.L. S. Amery gave his now-famous cry from the Conservative front bench, amid cheers, "S.eak for England."

    Graf Spee

  • Then a field hand from Timberrock Keep, somewhat the worse for drink, stood up to announce that soon enough there will be an heir at Timberrock Keep.

    Songs of Love & Death

  • Kissinger, who had admired the way Scowcroft once stood up to Haldeman, later recalled that he turned to the lieutenant general because he needed a strong person as my deputy, who would be willing to stand up to me if necessarynot every daybut to stand up for what he thought was right.

    In the Shadow of the Oval Office

  • I stood up to the ball again, settled my feet, made my waggles, and tried the high draw.

    The Italian Summer

  • Judith Anderson stood up to say that her lupus organization would assist residents in any way it could.

    The Autoimmune Epidemic

  • Experienced criminals, old hands who had been through all the police-stations in Europe, had not stood up to this test.

    Maigret at the Crossroads

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