Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past of strew.
  • v. Past participle of strew

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • His mother strewed wood-ashes on her head and blackened her face.

    Chapter 21

  • Letters and receipts, wet and pulpy, strewed the sand.

    CHAPTER 3

  • He also set the sublime tone, as in his famous account of the Jaws of Borrowdale, like a pass in the Alps "strewed with piles of fragments strangely thrown across each other, and of a dreadful bulk".

    A passion for painting in the Lake District

  • In a thousand spots the traces of the winter avalanche may be perceived, where trees lie broken and strewed on the ground; some entirely destroyed, others bent, leaning upon the jutting rocks of the mountain, or transversely upon other trees.

    Chapter 10

  • One day, when the sun shone on the red leaves that strewed the ground, and diffused cheerfulness, although it denied warmth,

    Chapter 15

  • The blown-out windows in the gothic-style mansion overlook a sandbagged courtyard strewed with 4x4s, fallen trees, stray dogs and empty bullet casings.

    Yemen edges closer to civil war as tribal leader takes fight to Saleh

  • (Soundbite of music) (Soundbite of TV show "Clouds of Witness") Mr. IAN CARMICHAEL (Actor): (as Lord Peter) You know, I've always thought those obliging criminals who strewed their tracks with articles of personal adornment were an invention of detective fiction for the benefit of the author.

    'Lord Peter' Returns, And It's No Mystery Why

  • The crowds of network anchors who had followed him from afar cheered “Hosanna” and waved great palm fronds and strewed them at his feet.

    Archive 2008-07-01

  • The smell of honey-glazed ham in the oven, sparkling tinsel hanging on the tree, colorful wrapping paper strewed across the floor, and those gifts that we dreamed about for months.

    Joel John Roberts: Is Ending Homelessness the Real Neverland?

  • Glass particles strewed the snow, like sequins on a wedding gown, crunching underfoot.

    Dark Oracle

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.