Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The aftermost oar in a rowboat, to the strokes of which those of the other oars must be conformed.
  • n. The oarsman who handles the stroke-oar; the strokesman.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But what startled Sheldon was the sight of a woman in the stern-sheets, between the stroke-oar and the steersman.

    Chapter 4

  • At college he pulled stroke-oar in the Christchurch boat, and had thrashed all the best bruisers of the

    Vanity Fair

  • "If the old feller don't put on brakes pretty soon the harpoon'll git so hot it'll melt the blubber and pull out," chuckled the stroke-oar.

    Swept Out to Sea Clint Webb Among the Whalers

  • He seemed to feel that he had the stroke-oar, and he pulled away manfully.

    Humorous Masterpieces from American Literature

  • What your progeny will not do for any considerations of ethics or economy, to save his sisters 'olfactories or the atmosphere of the family altar, -- that he does unflinchingly at one word from the stroke-oar or the commodore.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 08, No. 50, December, 1861

  • At college he pulled stroke-oar in the Christchurch boat, and had thrashed all the best bruisers of the “town.

    XI. Arcadian Simplicity

  • Otoo saw to it that he always pulled stroke-oar in my boat.

    The Heathen

  • So Punk became captain of the crew, and found himself at the old post of stroke-oar.

    The Dozen from Lakerim

  • The fame of the half-back and the short-stop and the stroke-oar has grown out of proportion to their real worth.

    The Young Pitcher

  • On account of the extreme scarcity of material, it was found necessary to require the Duke of Bethany, postmaster-general, to pull stroke-oar in the navy, and thus sit in the rear of a noble of lower degree, namely, Viscount Canaan, lord justice of the common pleas.

    The Great Revolution in Pitcairn

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